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Rape Laws Examined As New Sexual Assault Trend ‘Stealthing’ Emerges

‘Stealthing’, a terrifying new trend, has been recognized in the Columbia Journal of Gender and Law 

‘Stealthing’ is the non-consensual removal of condom birth control during otherwise consensual sexual intercourse.

The emerging fad has been quoted to be “an act of dominance” by male partners.

Online forums are riddled with males across all sexual orientations, discussing their reasons behind stealthing.

“One can note that proponents of ‘stealthing’ root their support in an ideology of male supremacy in which violence is a man’s natural right,” Alexandra Brodsky, a fellow at the National Women’s Law Center, is quoted in a Forbes article.

“For the study, author [Brodsky] interviewed victims of stealthing, as well as those online communities, where men promote their peers to “spread their seed” and “root their support [for the practice] in an ideology of male supremacy in which violence is a man’s natural right,” Fox News reports.

As we all know, condom use prevents pregnancy and STDs/STIs. Exposing a partner to a susceptibility venereal diseases is a breach in trust, as well as consent.

Such condom removal, popularly known as “stealthing,” can be understood to transform consensual sex into nonconsensual sex by one of two theories, one of which poses a risk of over-criminalization by demanding complete transparency about reproductive capacity and sexually transmitted infections.

But perhaps the most disturbing part of the trend refers back to our judicial system. The act, though clearly bypasses the individuals consent, is rarely reported as a form as sexual assault.

Even more scary, the act is not considered or defined as rape in the United States by any means. Brodsky is currently working on a proposal for a new statute– one that clearly identifies stealthing as sexual assault, with the consequences of such.

“The law isn’t the answer for everyone, and it can’t fix every problem every time,” she tells Fox News, “One of my goals with the article, and in proposing a new statute, is to provide a vocabulary and create ways for people to talk about what is a really common experience that just is too often dismissed as just ‘bad sex’ instead of ‘violence.’”

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Julia Ismail

Julia likes Nickelback & is unapologetic about it.